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Kids & Fitness

August 24, 2008

Welcome to the MonthlyClick - from ParentClick.com, the most comprehensive site connecting families to local resources.

 

We are excited to welcome 2 new territories... Orange County, CA and New Haven, CT.

 

Many families are gearing up for the new school year. Some parents are dropping their kindergartners off for their first day of school and others are sending their kids off to college.  Next month we will have our Back to School Guide with all the latest and greatest school products, tips on getting back into a routine and more. Read below to learn how you can win backpacks, books, art supplies and more.

 

~the ParentClick Team

 


Have you found a site in your city? AlohaParent.com, ArlingtonParent.com, CVParent.com, EastValleyParent.com, ElmCityParent.com, JaxParent.com, LIParentSource.com, MohaveCountyParent.com, OaksParent.com, OrangeCountyParent.com, RanchoParent.com, SanDiegoParent.com, SantaCruzParent.com, SBFamilies.com, SBParent.com, SouthBayParent.com, VailParent.com, VegasParent.com, VenturaParent.com, WestValleyParent.com. Each site focuses on their specific city bringing you the most current information on family resources, events, local perks, kids classifieds, contests and so much more. ParentClick.com is about sharing parenting information with recipes, book reviews, travel with kids and fun articles.

Olympics 2008 Olympics 2008

Families all over the country have been tuning in and following the 2008 Olympic Games.  There have been both exciting and heatbreaking moments throughout the competitions; however, one of the most positive outcomes of the games is the increased interest of both children and adults in sports programs.  The Olympics also offer a great example to our kids when they see what young people and adults can accomplish with practice and commitment.

 

USA Swimming, the sport’s national governing body, typically sees a bump in membership with the Olympics—5 percent after the 2000 Sydney games, 7.2 percent after the Athens Games. This time, swimming programs throughout the country are hoping for an increase of as much as 10 percent over the next year! 

 

Many other programs such as gymnastics, tennis and volleyball also report similar trends with an increase in calls and registrations when compared to their numbers last year at this time. 

 

This is all good news when childhood obesity is at an all-time high, kids are tuned into video games and computers and PE programs in the schools are on the decline.  Now is the time to support your child's interest in learning a new skill or sport and have them try something new; who knows, maybe you have the next Michael Phelps on your hands! 

 

Local recreation departments usually offer programs in gymnastics, swimming, tennis, volleyball, etc. and can be a great place to start and judge your child's interest in a particular sport.  Also, check out USA Swimming and USA Gymnastics websites for local clubs. 

 

The Closing Ceremonies are tonight and one can only wonder what 2012 will bring.  Congratulations to all of the athletes from around the world who participated in this year's games; they were all magnificent!

Contest! Contest!

SUBMIT A TRAVEL REVIEW...

We are excited to announce a CONTEST for ParentClick.com subscribers!  (BUILT IN) (ParentClick & Territory logos) TravelContest300.jpgWe are currently reviewing all kinds of GREAT Back-to-School  Products and have some to giveaway!! 

 

To enter, just submit a Travel Review --- tell us about a favorite family destination, a relaxing parents' getaway or a fun place to vacation with a group of friends. 

 

ALL submissions will be entered into the random drawing for cool back-to-school products that your kids will love!

No more soda! No more soda!

~Rachel Fierro, Personal Trainer

 

What would you do to save your child's life? Anything, right? I'm a mom too and there's nothing I wouldn't do to save my kids' lives if they were in danger. You can brush off what I'm about to say and call me a fanatic. Fine. When you're done, go do some research and you'll see that I wasn't exaggerating at all. You're kids are in danger right now - well, most kids that is. The worst part is, most parents aren't doing a thing about it either - mostly because they are in the same boat.

 

Something that tastes delicious, comes in bright packaging, and has a marketing campaign that makes it look harmless, is putting your kids' health (and your own) at terrible risk. Soda is garbage. It is the enemy of your body. There's nothing in soda that is good for your body and especially not for your kids' developing bodies.

 

Oh sure, soda doesn't seem to have any immediately obvious ill-effects. You don't cough, gag, break out in a rash, or fall down with convulsions. It may not be immediate, but soda is damaging us. For example, a recent study has shown that for every soft drink or sweetened beverage your kid drinks per day, increases their risk of obesity by 60%. Is that what you want for them?

 

Did you know that 20% of toddlers are now drinking soda? That's just plain wrong, folks. First of all we, adults, shouldn't be poisoning ourselves with the stuff. And to give it to kids is so much worse. Now we've got statistics showing that kids are drinking twice as much soda as they were 10 years ago. The average teen age boy drinking 3 sodas a day and the average teenage girl is drinking 2 a day, with some teens chugging down as much as seven cans a day. Most Americans are downing 56 gallons of soda a year.

 

Soda is pretty much just loaded with sugar (even if they use other names for it) and chemicals. There's about 10 teaspoons of sugar in one can of soda. Refined white sugar is about 99% pure calories - no vitamins, no minerals, no good stuff at all. And, no, diet soda is not any better. Aspartame and other artificial sweeteners are linked to all sorts of horrible diseases and conditions. Then there's all the caffeine, artificial colors, and sulfites in soda.

 

Want to know what all that stuff does to your body, to your kids' bodies? How about obesity, diabetes, and weakening of the bones, behavioral and attention issues? Is it good parenting to give your kids those maladies? Okay, parents, time to be a hero. Your kids may not like it, at first, but we are talking about their lives, here.

 

Start with you. Kick the soda habit . . . TODAY. Then (and I don't mean in a few days, weeks, or months, when you've got it down perfect) save your kids' lives and health. Explain it to them and then just cut that poison out of their lives. Give your kids the tools they'll need to have a healthy life - information, a good role model, and guidelines.

 

Don't replace that soda with more sweetened drinks either. Henry David Thoreau said "Pure water is the best drink for a wise man." That is indeed, the way to go. Some fruit juices (not just fruit flavored), but not too much. Pretty much, water is the way to go. You'll be doing yourself and your kids a world of good.

--- 

Rachel Fierro is a personal trainer in Santa Barbara, CA with great  online workouts for men and women.

Go on now, go! Go on now, go!

~by Jenna McCarthy

 

We don't have any family in town. A babysitter would be too expensive. And what if something happened to the girls while we were gone? Plus they're so young. And even though flying with them is no joyride, I truly cannot stomach the thought (as irrational as it may be) of getting on a plane without them.

 

"You have to do it," my sister insists. She means get away with my husband and without my kids. Easy for her to say. Her kids are ten years older than mine and her husband's entire family lives within a two mile radius of her house. She can count on one hand the number of times she's paid a babysitter. Her children see their aunts and uncles and grandparents on a weekly basis, whereas my kids know the UPS guy better than most of their non-nuclear relatives.

 

So when my sister-in-law offers to drive fourteen roundtrip hours to spend a few days with our daughters, my husband Joe is online booking a hotel room faster than you can say "complimentary continental breakfast." He wisely chooses a spot a quick two hour drive away, so factoring in the free babysitting and the fact that the girls are now old enough to wipe their own bottoms and operate the remote control, I'm out of excuses. I am going away without my kids.


I've got to tell you, I'm ambivalent. What will we do all day? ("Have sex!" Joe informs me cheerfully.) What if I can't relax? ("You'll drink more wine," he suggests.) What if the kids are sad and miserable? ("We won't be there to see it!" he roars. When he sees my horrified reaction, he quickly backpedals. "They'll live. Juli can handle it. It'll be good for all of us." Hrumph.)

 

Three weeks later I'm sprawled out on delicious ten-zillion thread-count sheets that are luxuriously wrapped around the Ugg boots of beds. It's two o'clock in the afternoon, or maybe it's eight-thirty at night. Who knows and who cares? I haven't filled one sippy cup, nuked a single dinosaur-shaped chicken nugget or chanted a rousing chorus of "clean up, clean up" all glorious day. My watch sits in a dish on the bathroom's cleaned-by-someone-else marble vanity, because I have nowhere to be but where I am. I've been rubbed with hot oil and warm towels, watched an entire uninterrupted, R-rated movie and let's just say that when holed up in a locked room for hours on end, it turns out Joe and I have no problem finding something enjoyable to do.

 

We stayed for three glorious days and I fell in love with my husband all over again. The girls were fine. Aunt Juli appeared unscathed-although it was sort of hard to tell as she blew past us, waved goodbye and peeled out of the driveway. Best of all (and I'm not proud of this or advocating thievery in any way) there's now a handy "Do not disturb" sign hanging on my bedroom door. I just wonder why we didn't think of that sooner.

 

--- 

Jenna McCarthy is the author of the upcoming book The Parent Trip: From High Heels and Parties to Highchairs and Potties. When she's not buying and returning bakeware, she can be reached at  jennamccarthy.com.


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